SUMMARY: How to manually sys-unconfig when single-user mode not an option?

John Christian john.christian at TheCReGroup.com
Wed Aug 11 09:46:51 EDT 2004


SUMMARY: How to manually sys-unconfig when single-user mode not an option?

  [Original post at bottom.]

Thanks to all who responded. Extra thanks to...

Jon Godfrey included great summaries of all files referenced in the
sys-unconfig manpage.
Andrea included many of the commands necessary to make the changes manually
along with reminders if the host was a NIS or NIS+ server.
Jason Santos reminded me to setup proper crash and dump device settings.
Ryan Krenzischek suggested checking print and NIS settings, regenerating the
ssh keys, and a good find command for finding any other instances of the
hostname that might be buried in non-standard files. Ryan also reminded me to
check for applications that may use license keys based on the machine's host
ID. (Compilers, Veritas, etc...)

-John Christian


SUMMARY OF FILES REF'D BY sys-unconfig MANPAGE

  /etc/default/init
Usually contains the TZ and CMASK environment variables to set your timezone
and default file mask settings

  /etc/defaultdomain
The NIS domain name

  /etc/defaultrouter
IP address of your default gateway.

  /etc/hostname.interface
Each interface on a system can be known by a different name.  The format is
/etc/hostname.<interface> where the file contains a hostname in ascii.  For
example, /etc/hostname.qfe0 could contain "mymachine" and /etc/hostname.qfe1
could contain "mymachine-150" (it might be multihomed and the second NIC
listens on 1.2.150.0/24 network.

  /etc/inet/hosts
/etc/hosts is symlinked to this file; same content and format that you
should know.

  /etc/inet/netmasks
Contains a line for each network your system listens on with two fields per
line consisting of the network and the netmask.  Example, "1.2.150.0
255.255.255.0"

  /etc/nodename
The primary hostname for your system.

  /etc/shadow
Contains encrypted passwords usually that are usually removed from
/etc/passwd.  Can be generated with the "pwconv" command when the
/etc/passwd file contains crypted passwords.

  /etc/vfstab
Your disk mounttab file.  Get yourself a hard copy of this before you
manually change anything.... Just in case...

  /var/nis/NIS_COLD_START
  /var/yp/binding/*/ypservers
These two are NIS related items.  I'm not sure about the NIS_COLD_START
file, but sys-unconfig just removes this stuff.  The second element defines
the NIS servers.

 Not so sure about mucking around with these...
  /etc/net/*/hosts
While I'm still not sure of the exact purpose to each of these three files,
their format is the same:  "<hostname>  <hostname>"

  /etc/.rootkey
Almost never used anymore.  Contained a key (like ssh does now) to try to
better authenticate the root user.  Safe to delete; probably does not exist
anyway.



PACKAGE THAT INCLUDES sys-unconfig

If you dont want to do it manually use following package to do it with the
sys-unconfig
command

                SUNWadmap                       CD1/1



NIS REMINDERS

Be carefully if the Server is a NIS or NIS+ Master or Replica. DO NOT modify
the server. If it is so. Do not forgett to change DNS entries if neccessary!



CRASH AND DUMP REMINDERS

mv /var/crash/oldhostname /var/crash/newhostname
dumpadm -s /var/crash/newhostname



PRINTING, SSH, NETGROUP, HOSTID, AND LICENSE KEY REMINDERS

If you have the Sun compiler, you will need to obtain a new license
for your new host (or any software that uses a license manager)

/etc/printers.conf (if you use this machine as a print spool)

Your SSH Keys will need to be regenerated on the new host.

/etc/lp/printers/PRINTERNAME/alert.sh will have the hostname hardcoded

Your /etc/netgroup file if you're running NIS.

These are the only things that come to mind that this time.
You might want to also:


FINDING HIDDEN HOSTNAME OCCURENCES

find /etc -type f -exec grep -il YOUR_HOSTNAME {} \;

to see if you're missing anything else.





________________________________

From: sunmanagers-bounces at sunmanagers.org on behalf of John Christian
Sent: Tue 8/10/2004 10:55 AM
To: sunmanagers at sunmanagers.org
Subject: How to manually sys-unconfig when single-user mode not an option?



How to manually sys-unconfig when single-user mode not an option?

Hi Gurus,

QUESTION
 Although sys-unconfig is great, due to remote-site limitations
 (no console) I cannot reboot into single user mode to input new
 hostname/IP/etc... settings, what are *ALL* of the little things
 sys-unconfig touches that I would need to manually modify before
 initiating a reboot?

 BTW: I am currently running on another disk/OS-install than the
 one I plan to modify then reboot from. See "Additional Details"
 further below.

RESEARCH SO FAR
 According to sys-unconfig man page, the following files are
 involved. Most are straightforward, but I'm not familiar with
 some:
 Comfortable changing these...
  /etc/default/init
  /etc/defaultdomain
  /etc/defaultrouter
  /etc/hostname.interface
  /etc/inet/hosts
  /etc/inet/netmasks
  /etc/nodename
  /etc/shadow
  /etc/vfstab
  /var/nis/NIS_COLD_START
  /var/yp/binding/*/ypservers
 Not so sure about mucking around with these...
  /etc/net/*/hosts
  /etc/.rootkey
 Other files or areas not mentioned in the man page that will
 cause trouble?
  /?/?/???

ADDITIONAL DETAILS
 E-450 SunOS 5.9 Generic_112233-08 sun4u sparc SUNW,Ultra-4

 I've been asked to duplicate a remote E-450 onto another
 remote E-450. Unfortunately, I do *not* have console access.
 I am running on disk0 of the E450 I'm building (default
 install of Solaris 9). I have created the boot block and
 restored the root file system of the original server onto
 disk1 of the new E450 (also Solaris 9).

 The original server is still online. IF I were on-site, I
 would disconnect the new 450 from the network, boot up as the
 original host, sys-unconfig (auto-reboot into single user
 mode), assign name/IP/etc, reboot and connect back to network.
 But I'm not on-site and don't have console access.

 Since I have the new root filesystem mounted, I *can* go in and
 manually modify /etc/hosts and other files to the new settings,
 use the eeprom command to set the host to boot from this newly
 ufsrestored slice, and reboot. (Actually, I'll set boot-device
 to "disk1 disk0" in case disk1 doesn't work.)


AGAIN, MY QUESTION IS
 Since I cannot reboot into single user mode to input new
 hostname/IP/etc... settings, what are *all* of the little things
 sys-unconfig touches that I would need to manually modify before
 initiating a reboot?

TIA for tips. I will summarize useful info.
-John Christian
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